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Sources of Toxins

Toxin

Sources

Description

Aluminum

Antacids, antiperspirants, baking powders, beverage/food cans, buffered aspirin, canned foods, city water supplies, cookware and utensils, cosmetics, foil, lipstick, ore smelting plants, processed cheeses, etc.

Abundant in today's environment and toxic in excessive quantities, aluminum is mostly absorbed through the skin, lungs, and intestinal tract. Aluminum toxicity seems to affect the bones (causing brittleness or osteoporosis), kidneys, stomach, and brain. Research suggests that it may also contribute to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia, and other neurological disorders.

Arsenic

Chemical processing plants, cigarette smoke, drinking water, fungicides, meats and seafood, metal foundries, ore smelting plants, pesticides, polluted air, specialty glass products, weed killers, wood preservatives, etc.

Extremely poisonous as well as colorless and odorless, arsenic can enter the body through the mouth, lungs and skin. Arsenic toxicity seems to predominantly affect the skin, lungs and gastrointestinal system, and may cause nervous disorders, deteriorated motor coordination, respiratory diseases, and kidney damage as well as cancers of the skin, liver, bladder and lungs.

Cadmium

Air pollution, batteries, ceramic glazes/enamels, cigarette smoke (both first and second hand), tap and well water, food (if grown in cadmium-contaminated soil), fungicides, mines, paints, power and smelting plants, seafood, etc.

Exposure to cadmium can occur through inhalation or ingestion in places or situations where cadmium products are used, manufactured, or ingested. Cigarette smoke is the biggest source of cadmium toxicity, which seems to primarily affect the lungs, kidneys, bones, and immune system. It may lead to lung cancer, prostate cancer and heart disease, and also causes yellow teeth and anemia. Cadmium also seems to contribute to autoimmune thyroid disease.

Lead

Air pollution, ammunition, auto exhaust, batteries, containers for corrosives, contaminated soil, cosmetics, fertilizers, foods (if grown in lead-contaminated soil), hair dyes, insecticides, lead-based paints, lead-glazed pottery, pesticides, solder, tobacco smoke, water (if transported via lead pipes), etc.

Lead is a naturally-occurring neurotoxin. Although many lead-containing products (such as gasoline and house paints) were banned in the 1970s, contamination still occurs today mostly by drinking lead-contaminated water, breathing lead-polluted air, and living in or near older painted buildings and certain toxic industrial areas. Lead toxicity primarily targets the nervous system, kidneys, bones, heart and blood, and poses greatest risk to infants, young children and pregnant women. It can affect fetal development, delay growth, and may also cause attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, behavioral defects, and other developmental problems.

Mercury

Air pollution, barometers, batteries, cosmetics, dental amalgam fillings, freshwater fish (such as bass and trout), fungicides, insecticides, laxatives, paints, pesticides, saltwater fish (such as tuna and swordfish), shellfish, tap and well water, thermometers, thermostats, vaccines, etc.

Both poisonous and dangerous, mercury is found throughout our environments in many forms and also in many household items. Mercury often permeates the ground we walk on, and is also found in some childhood vaccines today because of its use as a preservative. Mercury as used in dental fillings is the primary source of toxic exposure, and in vapor form accounts for the majority of all exposures (via inhalation). Mercury toxicity can affect the central nervous system, kidneys and liver. Research suggests that this heavy metal may also contribute to autism and multiple sclerosis.

Thallium

Infrared and electric eye optical devices, foods (if grown in thallium-contaminated soil), light-sensitive crystals, photocells, rodent and ant poisons (now discontinued), contaminated cocaine (or what is thought to be cocaine), semiconductors, etc.

Thallium is a toxic heavy metal with no known biological function. Human contamination can occur from oral ingestion as well as through the skins and lungs, especially if exposed to thallium-contaminated dust from lead and zinc smelting plants, pyrite burners, and similar processing sites. Thallium toxicity mainly affects the nervous system, and can lead to maladies such as hair loss, nerve degeneration, extremity numbness, and cataracts.

PCB's

Contaminated air, food, soil, water, etc.

These comprise the large group of chlorinated liquid and solid chemicals no longer produced in the U.S. but which still remain at large in the environment due to their binding abilities and lengthy breakdown periods. PCBs still taint air, water and soil in their places of manufacture, use, disposal, spillage, and leakage. In these areas, exposure to PCBs can occur through skin contact, inhalation, and ingestion of contaminated water, fish, and marine mammals.

Vaccination Residues

Immunizations for diphtheria, hepatitis B, Haemophilis influenzae type B (HIB), measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), etc.

Harmful toxins can remain in the body after certain vaccines for childhood and adult disease prevention are given. These leftover toxins (such as thimerosol, a known source of mercury and a suspected cause of childhood autism) can contribute to heavy metal burden and lead to other dangers.

Pesticide Residues

Domestic and imported fruits and vegetables (fresh, frozen and canned )

Non-organic fruits and vegetables can contain various neurotoxins and carcinogens left over from pesticide use. Ingesting such produce can result in dangerous levels of such chemical residues in the body. Apples, pears, fresh peaches, winter squash and spinach are among the produce commonly having highest pesticide residue levels.


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